Snow

Sunset Flight

Helicopter sunset flight over the Bernese Alps.

Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM
Aperture: f/4
Exposure time: 1/400s
Focal length: 88mm
ISO Speed: 100
Processed with PS CC 2015

Schreckhorn

Upper Grindelwald glacier and Schreckhorn during sunset.

Taken from the Gleckstein mountain hut.

Canon EOS 60D
Sigma 18-250mm F3,5-6,3 DC Makro OS HSM
Aperture: f/6.3
Exposure time: 1/80s
Focal length: 18mm
ISO Speed: 400
Processed with PS CC 2015

Gornergrat

All Rights reserved.

Gornergrat

The Gornergrat (English: Gorner Ridge; 3,135 m) is a rocky ridge of the Pennine Alps, overlooking the Gorner Glacier south of Zermatt in Switzerland. It can be reached from Zermatt by the Gornergrat rack railway, the highest open-air railway in Europe. Between the Gornergrat railway station (3,090 m) and the summit is the Kulm Hotel (3,120 m) hosting the new Project “Stellarium Gornergrat” and until 2010 the Kölner Observatorium für SubMillimeter Astronomie KOSMA and before that (until 2005) the Gornergrat Infrared Telescope.

It is located about three kilometers east of Zermatt in the Swiss canton of Valais. The Gornergrat is located between the Gornergletscher and Findelgletscher and offers a view of more than 20 four-thousand metre peaks, whose highest are Monte Rosa, Lyskamm, Matterhorn, Dom and Weisshorn.

This is the last stop of the Gornergrat train, opened in 1898, which climbs almost 1500m through Riffelalp and Riffelberg. At the terminus (3,089 m above sea level) on the south-western tip of the ridge is a hotel. The station forms part of the Zermatt ski area. From 1958 to 2007 there was a cable car from Gornergrat over the Hohtälli to the Stockhorn which, until the construction of the Klein Matterhorn cable car, was the highest mountain station in Zermatt. At the west side of the Gorner ridge, nearby the Rotenboden trainstation is the Riffelhorn peak.
Source: Wikipedia]

Canon EOS 60D
Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM
Aperture: f/9
Exposure time: 1/500s
Focal length: 10mm
ISO Speed: 100
Processed with PS CC 2014

Grindelwald (Snow Bivouac IV)

Fourth and last pic of our snow bivouac adventure. Stunning night view onto the village of Grindelwald. Exposure time almost 15 minutes, shortly before the full moon rose…

Grindelwald is a village and municipality in the Interlaken-Oberhasli administrative district in the canton of Bern in Switzerland. Besides the village of Grindelwald, the municipality also includes the settlements of Alpiglen, Burglauenen, Grund, Itramen, Mühlebach, Schwendi, Tschingelberg and Wargistal. Grindelwald village is located at 1,034 m above sea level in the Bernese Alps.

The tourism industry began in Grindelwald in the late 18th century as foreigners discovered the scenic town. Pictures of the vistas were widely reprinted, quickly making the village internationally famous. In the 19th century many Englishmen came to the village to climb the alpine peaks around the valley. The Finsteraarhorn (4,274 m), the Wetterhorn (3,692 m), the Eiger (3,970 m), the Schreckhorn (4,078 m) and the Gross Fiescherhorn (4,049 m) were all climbed during the 19th century.
The Grindelwald road was built in 1860–72, and the Bernese Oberland railway reached the village in 1890, both of which transformed an arduous journey into a simple trip and allowed tourists to flood into the village. The first resort opened in 1888, there were 10 hotels in 1889, and by 1914 there were 33 in Grindelwald. A rack railway was built to Kleine Scheidegg in 1893, and it was expanded to the Jungfraujoch in 1912. Numerous ski lifts, cable cars, hiking trails and alpine huts were built in the late 19th and 20th centuries to allow tourists to explore the mountains. Today, almost the entire economy of Grindelwald is based on tourism.
[Source: Wikipedia]

Canon EOS 60D
Sigma 18-250mm F3,5-6,3 DC Makro OS HSM
Aperture: f/4
Exposure time: 848s
Focal length: 18mm
ISO Speed: 100
Manfrotto Tripod
Processed with PS CC 2014

Extreme Ground Handling (Snow Bivouac III)

The third pic of my snow bivouac series shows me doing some ground handling in a breathtaking scenery.

Ground handling is the art of being in touch with your glider. Once in the air, things are pretty simple due the fact that you are suspended directly underneath the glider and keeping it fully loaded with your weight.

Being on the ground is a different story. Now you have to move with the glider in order to stay centered, or directly underneath it. If you are behind the curve in moving with your glider it can fall in front or behind you or off to one side or the other. Practice in this area gives you the ability to feel where the glider is over your head without having to look at it. This in turn teaches you to move intuitively with your glider. When you have the “feel” of your glider you can anticipate what it is going to do, and make an input before the glider gets too far out of center. This skill helps tremendously when launching, and will make you a better all around pilot. It is easy to only want to fly once you get your rating, but try to get out and do some groundhandling whenever you can.

Your ability to control your glider in a variety of different conditions and situations will allow you to be confident and focus on your launch.
[Source: eagleparagliding.com]

Canon EOS 60D
Sigma 18-250mm F3,5-6,3 DC Makro OS HSM
Aperture: f/3.5
Exposure time: 1/800s
Focal length: 18mm
ISO Speed: 400
Processed with PS CC 2014

Older Posts →
← No Newer Posts